Yeasts New Use: Making Narcotic Painkillers: THURSDAY.

Other labs have been focusing on poppy-free opioid creation. IN-MAY, a University of California, Berkeley team published a report in the journal Character Chemical Biology describing all but one step of a process to use genetically altered yeast to convert basic sugar into morphine. In this new study, the Stanford team reprogrammed the genetics of regular baker’s yeast – – used for a large number of years to leaven bread – – so the organism’s fast-growing cells could actually convert sugar in to the painkiller hydrocodone in just 3 to 5 days.

IMAGE Could mutations in components of the LKB1/AMPK pathway underlie both pathologies And if therefore, could drugs that efficiently antagonize diabetes also antagonize tumor growth Those questions are following on Shaw’s agenda. Not merely will we continue to dissect this pathway biochemically, but we will even more directly check whether we can treat particular types of tumors in mouse versions with diabetes medications, Shaw says. Also contributing to this scholarly study from the Shaw lab were postdoctoral fellows David Shackelford, Ph.D., and Annabelle Mery, Ph.D., graduate student Maria Mihaylova, and study assistants Debbie Vasquez and Daniel Egan.

TODAY Study Group: A Clinical Trial to Maintain Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes Increases in childhood obesity have been accompanied by an elevated incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth.1,2 Because the threat of microvascular and macrovascular problems in adults raises with both duration of diabetes and lack of glycemic control,3,4 it really is vital to achieve and sustain metabolic control in youth.IMAGE Could mutations in components of the LKB1/AMPK pathway underlie both pathologies And if therefore, could drugs that efficiently antagonize diabetes also antagonize tumor growth Those questions are following on Shaw’s agenda. Not merely will we continue to dissect this pathway biochemically, but we will even more directly check whether we can treat particular types of tumors in mouse versions with diabetes medications, Shaw says. Also contributing to this scholarly study from the Shaw lab were postdoctoral fellows David Shackelford, Ph.D., and Annabelle Mery, Ph.D., graduate student Maria Mihaylova, and study assistants Debbie Vasquez and Daniel Egan.

TODAY Study Group: A Clinical Trial to Maintain Glycemic Control in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes Increases in childhood obesity have been accompanied by an elevated incidence of type 2 diabetes in youth.1,2 Because the threat of microvascular and macrovascular problems in adults raises with both duration of diabetes and lack of glycemic control,3,4 it really is vital to achieve and sustain metabolic control in youth.